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Why Your Emails shouldn’t only be an Image

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Plenty of people send emails that are just a single image with no additional text. But this may not be a really good idea for you to do. Why? More after the jump.
Loading Time
When an image is too big it will take a longer time to load when your customer opens your email. If your entire message is contained in the image, then your readers on slower Internet connections will miss the information you’re trying to share. It’s best to re-size your image to speed up loading time.
Image Blocking
Most email clients block images in emails by default for security reasons, and just under half of consumers don’t adjust these settings therefore if your customers have images blocked in their inboxes, they won’t be able to read your message if it’s all contained in just one image.
Not Mobile Friendly
Smartphone and tablet screens are much smaller than a normal computer screen, and your emails will display in a different way for customers reading on their mobile devices. The iPhone automatically resizes emails to fit on the screen, but any text on a big image would be unreadable at that size. Android phones don’t resize emails. Instead, your readers are required to scroll across and up and down a large image to read your whole message. That gets frustrating really quickly on a 4-inch screen.
What You Can Do Instead
· Balance Text and Images: Instead of using a single image try balancing text with smaller images. Including text in addition to your image means that customers who are reading your email on a smartphone or use image blocking will still get your information without viewing your image.
· Use Descriptive Alt Text: Any time you use images in your email, make sure to include descriptive alt text for your readers who have images blocked by their email clients. The alt text displays when the image is blocked. Make sure your alt text reflects any text component in your image.
· Use Smaller Images or Thumbnails: If you send a weekly circular or menus or similar content to your customers, send a smaller version of your image to your customers’ inboxes instead of uploading the full-sized image. You can link the image to a larger version on your website or microsite and include a note in your email for customers to click through for the whole image.
· Optimize for Mobile: Finally, to make sure your images are mobile-friendly, make sure they’re not wider than 600 pixels. You can resize your image in the message editor by clicking and dragging the sides of your image. You can also use image editing software on your computer to re-size your image before uploading it.
Plenty of people send emails that are just a single image with no additional text. But this may not be a really good idea for you to do. Why?

Loading Time

When an image is too big it will take a longer time to load when your customer opens your email. If your entire message is contained in the image, then your readers on slower Internet connections will miss the information you’re trying to share. It’s best to re-size your image to speed up loading time.

Image Blocking

Most email clients block images in emails by default for security reasons, and just under half of consumers don’t adjust these settings, therefore if your customers have images blocked in their inboxes, they won’t be able to read your message if it’s all contained in just one image.

Not Mobile Friendly

Smartphones and tablet screens are much smaller than a normal computer screen, and your emails will display in a different way for customers reading on their mobile devices. The iPhone automatically resizes emails to fit on the screen, but any text on a big image would be unreadable at that size. Android phones don’t re size emails. Instead, your readers are required to scroll across and up and down a large image to read your whole message. That gets frustrating really quickly on a 4-inch screen.

What You Can Do Instead

· Balance Text and Images: Instead of using a single image try balancing text with smaller images. Including text in addition to your image means that customers who are reading your email on a smartphone or use image blocking will still get your information without viewing your image.

· Use Descriptive  Alternative Text: Any time you use images in your email, make sure to include descriptive alternative text for your readers who have images blocked by their email clients. The alternative text displays when the image is blocked. Make sure your alternative text reflects any text component in your image.

· Use Smaller Images or Thumbnails: If you send a weekly circular or menu or similar content to your customers, send a smaller version of your image to your customers’ inboxes instead of uploading the full-sized image. You can link the image to a larger version on your website or microsite and include a note in your email for customers to click through for the whole image.

· Optimize for Mobile: Finally, to make sure your images are mobile-friendly, make sure they’re not wider than 600 pixels. You can re size your image in the message editor by clicking and dragging the sides of your image. You can also use image editing software on your computer to re-size your image before uploading it.

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