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Screen Your Message for Spam

Whether your meant it or not, spam messages are not appreciated by recipients, including your subscribers. We know you would never spam anyone, but in case your email comes close with some words or formatting styles which may be confused for spam, we have a nifty spam checker to screen your message before sending. That way, you’ll know it’s safe to send without worry.

Our spam checker identifies any suspicious formatting or overused offer words, such as “100% FREE”, “No fees”, “click here”, or “risk free” that would cause a message to be flagged as spam. As long as your message receives a score below 5.0, you’re unlikely to be considered spam.

Just click ‘check spam score’ before sending your message.

Tip #1: Make sure that what you say in your subject line relates to the rest of your mail. Don’t surprise your readers with unexpected content.

Tip #2: Fulfill the expectations you set at signup. Don’t send more content than you advertise, or you may end up flagged as spam.

Tip #3: Keep your content relevant to the reader and you will reduce the likelihood they will perceive it as spam. Segmenting your lists can help!

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Did you screen your message for spam before you sent it out?

We recommend that you take advance of the great spam checker we have to screen your message before sending. As you know, spam messages are not appreciated by recipients, including your subscribers. We know you would never try to spam your customers, but if your email comes close with some words or formatting styles which may be confused for spam, your email might get confused with spam.

We have a spam checker that identifies any suspicious formatting or overused offer words, such as “free" +hurry" "buy now" that would cause a message to be flagged as spam. Make sure that your score is less than 5.0.  Make sure to click the  'check spam score' before sending your message.

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Avoiding Spam is Easy

  • Avoid publicly advertising your address on any websites where you do not have complete control of your own privacy.
  • Do not submit your email address to websites or companies that you’re unfamiliar with.
  • Always read the fine print when signing up for anything.
By default, there is usually  a text box that you need to pick to opt out of receiving email marketing material from the website you are in (trying to buy something), that you’re required to fill out when buying goods, make sure you unmark an option that says you allow to receive their emails.
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5 quick tips for avoiding SPAM

1) Do not submit your email address to websites or companies that you’re unfamiliar with and / or have no reason to trust 2) Avoid publicly advertising your address on any websites and forums where you do not have complete control of your own privacy 3) Always read the fine print and privacy policy when signing up for anything 4) Create separate addresses for core communications and disposable ones for general use 5) Mark unwanted mail as spam 6) Unsubscribe
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SPAM Toggling on Opt-in forms

As with anything the bigger it grows, the more it is abused. Email marketing is not immunized from this. Spammers continue to find new ways of molesting this effective marketing tool to serve their individual malicious intent.  As such, the CAN-SPAM act as well as various others such as The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has implemented more stringent laws.
Spamming is a criminal offence and is taken very seriously. They could have severe consequences and can easily have cases brought against spammers.
In the US, consumers can sue under State and Federal fraud and deceptive trade practice laws but must show more damage than the business expenses associated in combating spam. Spam messages can be fined as much as US $300 per unsolicited email sent.
This stresses the procedure of having consumers opt-in for email or text communications.
Enter the role of toggling
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission summarized that “toggling” is a way of switching between different tick boxes.  The Commission also notes that toggling has been used as an opt-out consent mechanism rather than an opt-in consent mechanism, as the default toggle undertakes consent on the part of a person.
Now many people are unaware that it is in fact infringing on the act, when a pre-checked box on a website which requires the consumer to action against receiving email. In other words, once you already landed on a certain page, the opt-in is already checked or opted in without a client having to do so.
Figure 1: An example of toggling that assumes consent
Now the Commission has considered that an out-right action is needed for an agreement to be considered as opt-in to receive communication from a company. Therefore having the consumer to action an opt-out as opposed to an opt-in, is not considered lawful and the default setting needs to be left in an untainted manner.
Figure 2: Acceptable express consent mechanisms – Checking a box to indicate consent
Figure 3: Acceptable express consent mechanisms – Typing an email address into a field to indicate consent
If a consumer opts-in for correspondence, the company is also required to send a confirmation of the particular person, whose authorization is being sought.
Not only does this ensure that companies are not being marked as spam, but it also reassures their clients that they are taking the necessary steps in making sure they are not merely spamming their contact lists.

SPAM Toggling on Opt-in forms

As with anything the bigger it grows, the more it is abused. Email marketing is not immunized from this. Spammers continue to find new ways of molesting this effective marketing tool to serve their individual malicious intent.  As such, the CAN-SPAM act as well as various others such as The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has implemented more stringent laws.

Spamming is a criminal offence and is taken very seriously. They could have severe consequences and can easily have cases brought against spammers.

In the US, consumers can sue under State and Federal fraud and deceptive trade practice laws but must show more damage than the business expenses associated in combating spam. Spam messages can be fined as much as US $300 per unsolicited email sent.

This stresses the procedure of having consumers opt-in for email or text communications.

Enter the role of toggling

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission summarized that “toggling” is a way of switching between different tick boxes.  The Commission also notes that toggling has been used as an opt-out consent mechanism rather than an opt-in consent mechanism, as the default toggle undertakes consent on the part of a person.

Now many people are unaware that it is in fact infringing on the act, when a pre-checked box on a website which requires the consumer to action against receiving email. In other words, once you already landed on a certain page, the opt-in is already checked or opted in without a client having to do so.

Now the Commission has considered that an out-right action is needed for an agreement to be considered as opt-in to receive communication from a company. Therefore having the consumer to action an opt-out as opposed to an opt-in, is not considered lawful and the default setting needs to be left in an untainted manner.

If a consumer opts-in for correspondence, the company is also required to send a confirmation of the particular person, whose authorization is being sought.

Not only does this ensure that companies are not being marked as spam, but it also reassures their clients that they are taking the necessary steps in making sure they are not merely spamming their contact lists.

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Four Quick Tips on How to Avoid Receiving Spam in your Inbox

1. Avoid publishing your email address on any web page and forums where they have complete control over your privacy.

2. Always mark an unwanted email as spam.

Email services like Hotmail or Gmail create a filter to automatically detect all emails that are spam and then they file a complaint to the network which sent the email. If there are many complaints generated by a sender, your email service will block it completely.

3. Do not enter your email address on websites, and companies that you are unfamiliar with or have a reason to distrust.

You do not give your phone number or home address to a stranger, the same rationale applies to email addresses.

4. Unsubscribe from emails you do not want to receive. Please keep in mind that a good email marketing company will ensure that its subscribers have options to unsubscribe from all headers and footers in the press.

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How to do Top of the Line Email Marketing

Make sure you build a legitimate list of contacts, permission provides a foundation for delivering value, because the people on your address list are interested in the emails you send, so what you really want is the biggest possible list of individuals who have asked to hear about what you offer, and not just a lot of random email addresses. Also, choose a great ESP such as Emailbrain for your needs: An ESP (Email Service Provider) hosts email marketing software online, which is specifically optimized to do the heavy-lifting for bulk newsletter sending. Before you start emailing, it’s vital that you choose the best choose the best ESP for your business.

Do not forget that it is also important to target your data and that sending irrelevant or generic emails can be risky, as these may provoke recipients to ignore your messages or mark them as spam. Since subscribers have individual likes, as your list grows it becomes important to identify groups that share similar interests and use segmentation (the practice of clustering addresses) to improve your results, by sending appealing content targeted to their specific wants.

Also, it is important to design your newsletters With Mobile in Mind, with email inboxes more crowded than ever, at least half of the battle is in finding ways to stand out from the masses with the quality of your design. Make sure to add a clear unsubscribe link, spam complaints can have a disastrous effect on your sender reputation. Unfortunately, even when people have explicitly signed up for an email they may still use the "report spam" button. Some readers even use the report spam button instead of going through the proper unsubscribe process, since both tactics have the same outcome for them. Always write an appealing subject line and increase your open rate. By writing a subject line is a very important element of your communications strategy that you shouldn’t leave until deadlines are looming. These first few characters are the doorstep to your emailing success; since it’s all you have to entice readers to open your message. Since a subject line should distill the essence of an email, consider writing it first, as this will help keep your content from straying off topic.

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How to avoid SPAM

Try to avoid advertising your address on any websites and forums where you do not have complete control of your own privacy. If for some reason you would need to include an email address, try to obscure it for spam bots.

Make sure you unsubscribe: A good email marketing company will ensure that their users include unsubscribe options in all email headers and /or footers. With that said, many people believe that clicking an unsubscribe link actually confirms to a spammer that the user exists/actively reads their mail.

It is a must that you read the fine print and privacy policy when signing up for anything. Often there is a text box that you need to select to opt out of receiving email marketing material from the company in question.

Create separate addresses for core communications and disposable ones for general use: It would be a good idea to have one email account for your banking, mortgage, e-statements and so on - all of your essential life necessities.

Mark unwanted mail as spam: Email services such as Hotmail and Gmail will create a filter to automatically spot all future mail from that source as junk and it will submit a complaint against the network that sent the mail to reputation monitoring services

Do not submit your email address to websites or companies that you are unfamiliar with and / or have no reason to trust. You wouldn’t think of giving your mobile number to strangers, after all - the same justification applies to your email address.

A disposable address is an inbox that you will typically use when a store asks you to fill out your details for purposes such as future specials, club membership or anything that’s not important to you or that you want to specifically keep separate.

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Recommendations on How to Avoid Email Marketing Complaints

Spam email is any email which the recipient never asked for. However, even where people have signed up for an email, they may still use the "report spam" button if the emails they get are not what they expected, or if the recipients forget about the original opt-in.

here a list of things you can do to prevent your emails from getting marked as SPAM:

  • Don't buy email addresses, as these people are not expecting email from you.
  • Ensure your sign-up forms and pages let subscribers make an informed and a clear choice to join a list and explain what kind of emails they can expect.
  • Don't wait too long to send out your first email (no more than 2 weeks after a subscriber signs up to your list) and make sure new subscribers always get an immediate welcome message.
  • Don't leave more than a few weeks between any sends thereafter.

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Avoid Currency Signs ($$$) in the Subject Line

You may think that a dollar --or any currency-- sign in the subject line of your message might be a clever way to promote a sale or a business. Truth is most people, including ISPs and junk mail filters, will delete your email without even finishing to read the subject line.

Like I've said before, no one likes junk mail, and your email marketing campaigns should avoid any similarities with spam.

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